Wildlife, Water, and Landscape Connectivity Workshop

Wildlife, Water, and Landscape Connectivity
Saturday, October 17 8:30am – 12:30pm + lunch Omega Institute
Space is Limited. REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED.

Designed especially for landowners in the Town of Clinton and neighboring towns, this workshop will explore the ways that wildlife use our forests, meadows, wetlands, and streams, and discuss the importance of landscape connectivity to maintaining habitat quality, wildlife populations, and the integrity of our ecosystems. Co-instructors are Chris Graham and Gretchen Stevens (Hudsonia biologists) and Laura Heady (Hudson River Estuary Program Conservation and Land Use Coordinator). The workshop is sponsored by the Town of Clinton Conservation Advisory Council, and hosted by the Omega Institute.

Through indoor and outdoor lectures and discussions, participants will learn about the status of some of our rare, uncommon, and vulnerable wildlife species—from butterflies, salamanders, turtles, and bats, to hawks, waterfowl, otters, and bobcats, and the different parts of the landscape they use to fulfill their life history needs.

Discussions will include basic biodiversity conservation principles that can be applied widely to the management of individual properties, the design of new development projects, and townwide, intermunicipal, and region-wide conservation planning. Discussions will also include concepts of landscape connectivity, consequences of habitat fragmentation, and ways to preserve or restore upland, wetland, and stream connectivity when siting and designing new land uses.

Participants will examine habitat maps for the Dutchess County (NY) towns of Clinton, Hyde Park, Rhinebeck, Stanford, and Washington to identify areas that may provide important habitats and wildlife migration corridors, especially for species sensitive to human disturbances. A field session on and near the Omega property will examine natural and infrastructure features that represent barriers as well as those that help to connect habitats across the landscape.

 

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